DAVID FLYNN
ARCHITECTS

Howth


Standing above the Howth seaside, this house sits in an unusual development of detached gable-fronted dormers. Having been extended a few times already, the new project aims to reassert the free-standing geometry of the original house and also lend it a more relaxed, maritime character.

Residential Extension: 55.5m2, Refurbishment: 126.9m2

Rear extension
Proposed rear elevation

This project involves the reimagining of the old house involving refurbishment and significant extension. Horizontal timber cladding with external insulation give an almost nautical character to the house while increasing the buildings energy efficiency. A new recessed porch provides a clear entrance, replacing the characterless, somewhat ambiguous side doorway.

A new roof extends down from the original pitched roof to incorporate the converted garage as an integral part of the house. This new roof creates a single cohesive gable fa├žade while maintaining the rhythm of the house and street.

The house comprised of a mishmash of small, disjointed rooms which were added one after the other over the past number of decades. These rooms are to be completely removed and replaced with a large open plan kitchen-living-dining space. Although open plan, these spaces have their own distinct area and have been designed around the furniture the clients have amassed over their lifetime.

A new glazed corner with sliding doors allows the interior to spill out to the new paved patio and sloped garden beyond. Internally, the kitchen ceiling curves dramatically like a wave, up to large rooflight which will flood the living spaces with sunlight throughout the day.

Front elevation visualisation
The new works reinstate a detached house, and play the with original gable to create a new asymmetric arrangement with a recessed central porch defining a clear entrance. Timber cladding, suggested by the seaside location, gives character and homeliness.


Before
The original entrance having been subsumed into an ill-conceived side extension, the front of the house had become somewhat blank and featureless.

Front elevation

Front elevation visualisation
The new works reinstate a detached house, and play the with original gable to create a new asymmetric arrangement with a recessed central porch defining a clear entrance. Timber cladding, suggested by the seaside location, gives character and homeliness.
Before
The original entrance having been subsumed into an ill-conceived side extension, the front of the house had become somewhat blank and featureless.

Context model
The original houses were detached gable-fronted dormers with their entrances to the side. Over time carports and side extensions filled in the space between the houses, many of which were left without an obvious entrance point.

Context model

Context model
The original houses were detached gable-fronted dormers with their entrances to the side. Over time carports and side extensions filled in the space between the houses, many of which were left without an obvious entrance point.

Location
Dalkey, Dublin

Completion
...

Architect
David Flynn Architects Ltd.

Structural Engineer
...

Main Contractor
...

Photography
(Pending)

Entrance Porch
Centred on the new front elevation, the hall door has been recessed to create a shelter in this breezy seaside location.

Recessed Porch

Entrance Porch
Centred on the new front elevation, the hall door has been recessed to create a shelter in this breezy seaside location.

A large South-facing rooflight sits atop a dramatic scooped ceiling to enliven the kitchen dining space below.

Extending to the side and rear, the new roof picks up on the geometry of the original house, and is clad in timber to form a material counterpoint to the original rendered house.

Digital Model

Rear model view 1 A large South-facing rooflight sits atop a dramatic scooped ceiling to enliven the kitchen dining space below.

Digital Model

Rear model view 2 Extending to the side and rear, the new roof picks up on the geometry of the original house, and is clad in timber to form a material counterpoint to the original rendered house.